Somewhere beyond the se…rialism! [Pt. 2]

My personal journey into serial composition doesn’t end up yet! Lately, I’ve taken a stab at applying the ten tones-row of Copland’s Piano Fantasy (1957) to the pattern assignment procedure I described in the previous post. I followed the coming outline (actually a semi-serial outline!). The row employed by Copland in the Fantasy is shown above.

I threaded the original row into two complex rhythmic sets based on the combination of five simple rhythmic patters (described previously) and I aligned them:

A D E A B C
C A D E A B

• • • – – – – – – • – • – • • • • • – • – – • • – – – – – • • • • • – • – • – • – • • – – • • •
– • • – – • • • • • • – – – – – – • – • – • • • • • – • – – • • – – – – – • • • • • – • – • – •

Then I systematically transposed one voice letting the other lying still and vice-versa (I wrote a Perl script to generate the LilyPond output shown above). I obtained the twenty-two pitch variants of the two voices alignment based on the original Copland’s row. Note that each variant/staff could be transposed further on with a resulting amount of 276 pitch variants of the same pattern alignment!

At the end, I arbitrarily chose two variants (this is the not-serial part!). I assigned them respectively to the left hand and to the right hand and I composed the following piano piece:

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About epogdous

I'm an italian student of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology in Sapienza University of Rome. Dispite my scientific interests (which range from structural biology to immunology, etc.) I cultivate a deep passion for classical music and in general for musicology. As a teen I studied the flute but basically I'm a self-taught pianist and composer. I'm well-acquainted with the music of 1850-1950 era. I generally don't like to say I have preferences for some composer in particular but I can't deny that Ralph Vaughan Williams and Charles Ives hold a great fascination to me. I think that the common message of their music is the transcendentalist precept "low living, high thinking".
This entry was posted in classical music, composition, harmony, musicology, rhythm, serialism and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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